Humanistic Paganism

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Spinning an Interview, by Bart Everson

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Draw a circle to represent the year: one complete revolution around the sun. Make a mark at the top and the bottom, the left and the right, dividing the circle into four equal quarters. Let these represent the solstices and the equinoxes. Now rotate the whole thing about 45º and make the marks again. These marks fall midway between the others, dividing the circle into eighths. Call these the cross-quarter days. You’ve just sketched the Wheel of the Year……

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The Fall Equinox Approaches!

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In the Northern Hemisphere, the fall equinox is celebrated in a couple weeks (it is September 22nd this year) as Mabon, also called Harvest Home. (Those in the Southern Hemisphere celebrate the spring equinox, Ostara, at this time.)

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Interrupted Visions: Your chance to join with the Foundation Beyond Belief to help victims of the flooding

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Yes, I know we are in the middle of our 3 part series on visions, but we well know that weather systems don’t care what we humans are doing.  This week, extreme rainfall caused historic flooding in Louisiana, with people…

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Visions Part 2: Visions and Delusions, by Megan Manson

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I think that it’s a bit of both. As I described in my post on skull symbolism, the human brain is remarkable and can be considered the means by which the Universe perceives itself – linking us all to the force that some call Gaia. Looking at it this way, we too are part of the divine – meaning that any experience in our minds can be interpreted as a spiritual one. Maybe where the gods come into this is how we interpret that experience.

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Visions, Part 1: Integrating Critical Lenses into Spirituality as a Naturalistic Pagan Goal, by Emile Wayne

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Our spirituality integrates not only ways of seeing the world – critical and spiritual – but also integrates us into the world. It is a spirituality that builds deep connections between and among all the Beings with whom we share our breathing, dancing, changing planet, whirling through space. If there is a set of tools that offers us insight into those lives with whom we share a deep kinship, from our fellow primates and mammals all the way into the depths of the sea, then it is useful and essential to our spiritual path(s). We must heed what these tools teach us, whether the lesson is a humbling confirmation of the kinship of all life, or a startling reminder about the fragility of our ecosystems. By doing so, we also (re)claim religion as a fundamentally human endeavor, one that helps us speak to the depths and heights of our experiences.

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