Humanistic Paganism

Category: science


Psych Meds, Self-Care and Paganism, by Lupa Greenwolf

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You’ll notice that in the graphic at the top of this post I made my own modifications to the original meme. I state that both nature and psych meds are “one of many tools for managing mental illness.” When it comes to living with an illness–any illness–I believe it’s important to make as many options available as possible. That means that I see the nature/meds situation as a both/and one, not either/or.

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You can help every child realize that they are stardust!

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For many of us Naturalistic Pagans, the roots of our spirituality can be traced back to when we first realized what a vast, ancient Universe we are part of. Often, that began with Carl Sagan’s Cosmos, or Neil deGrasse-Tyson’s more recent remake of Cosmos. We now have a chance to help bring that magic to more kids who are wondering about it all as well.

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DNA Testing: Making Ancestor Worship a Science! by Renee Lehnen

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When people learn about their DNA, they strengthen their ties to our great big 7 billion member human family. Each and every one of us is the child of sturdy people who survived plagues, war, bad hair days, and myriad calamities. Our ancestors, royal and pauper, had a 100 per cent success rate in the game of life. We face the future with our illustrious, amazing, inherited DNA.

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My Favorite Ritual Tool, by Mark Green [an Atheopagan Life]

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It’s common for humans to have things with symbolic meaning…what we often call “sentimental value”. Atheopagans are just more deliberate about it, and conscious of how to use these associations for our psychological benefit.

What are your favorite ritual tools?

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Spinning an Interview, by Bart Everson

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Draw a circle to represent the year: one complete revolution around the sun. Make a mark at the top and the bottom, the left and the right, dividing the circle into four equal quarters. Let these represent the solstices and the equinoxes. Now rotate the whole thing about 45º and make the marks again. These marks fall midway between the others, dividing the circle into eighths. Call these the cross-quarter days. You’ve just sketched the Wheel of the Year……

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