Humanistic Paganism

Category: Mark Green


Presenting Ourselves to the World by Mark Green [an Atheopagan Life]

So I’m going to make a change. When I engage community and political leadership, I’m going to wear my Atheopagan lapel pin. If I’m asked about it, I will briefly describe what it means. If that means that my credibility drops, well, so be it. Maybe people like me have to be the thin edge of the wedge.

We have wise people in this community: people of heart and intellect and compassion and courage. Their voices should be heard by those who make decisions on behalf of all of us.

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On Pentagrams and a Cool New Symbol for Atheopaganism

A single, recognizable symbol for an idea, movement or spiritual path is important – both because it is a quick way to convey a lot of information, as well as because it helps group cohesion form.

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“What Naturalism Means to Me” by Mark Green

Naturalism is the spirituality of the real. A celebration of this world, this cosmos, this humanity, this biosphere.

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Dark Hallows by Mark Green [an Atheopagan Life]

This will be Dark Sun circle’s 27th annual gathering for Samhain. Our ritual includes a hushed circle of remembrance around the unlit fire, a silent walk into the woods to visit the Land of the Dead, and, once there, we speak their names, tell them what we would have liked them to have known about our feelings, our memories, our wishes and our love. Upon return from the Land of the Dead, we light the fire and the candles and jack o’lanterns on the Focus and celebrate, singing “We Are Alive!”, sharing goblets of blood-red wine and chocolate. And then, when it is time, we go indoors and break our fast with a sumptuous meal.

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Why Naturalism? Because This. by Mark Green [an Atheopagan Life]

Willingness to take someone’s word about supposed supernatural processes and invisible beings is a formula for being abused. Healthy skepticism would have tossed this creep out on his ear long ago, but the conventions of many Pagan communities which take at face value highly improbable assertions about the nature of reality create safe contexts within which abusers can operate.

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