Humanistic Paganism

Category: A Pedagogy of Gaia


Will This Congressman Reflect on our Earth? By Bart Everson

This was not an angry protest. This was something gentler and more contemplative. I’m inclined to think we need more such actions. Will Scalise listen? Will he reflect? Time will tell. I’m not holding my breath, but the stakes are too high not to try everything in our power. Meanwhile, I call on our local “young faith leaders” to step up, add their voices, and stage similar actions.

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[A Pedagogy of Gaia] “The Surprising Results of Magical Thinking” by Bart Everson

Generally speaking, philosophical naturalists don’t believe in magic, so any invocation of the term is likely to be pejorative. For those with a naturalistic mindset, the phrase “magical thinking” is often a diss or a criticism, a suggestion of logical gaps or inconsistencies, similar to wishful thinking. But I think wholesale disavowal goes too far. So next time you’re down in New Orleans, come take a walk on this path made from dreams. See for yourself the glorious results that can come from magical thinking.

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[A Pedagogy of Gaia] “Consecrating Our Compost Bin” by Bart Everson

O compost bin, o compost bin
How gentle is thy turning
O compost bin, o compost bin
How gentle is thy turning
We feed you wet greens and dry browns
You give us soil to spread around
O compost bin, o compost bin
How gentle is thy turning

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[A Pedagogy of Gaia] “Fleeting Visions” by Bart Everson

If I said that I saw visions, would you be alarmed? Frankly, I’d have some concerns if I heard a statement like that. I might worry about the person’s mental health. I might question their sanity and stability. At the…

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[A Pedagogy of Gaia] “The P-Word” by Bart Everson

I call myself Pagan because wild nature is awesome, and I experience Earth as sacred, and I realize I don’t have a well-delineated self separate from the planetary ecosystem. I call myself Pagan because I think honoring the ancestors is a good idea, and I feel a connection to antiquity, and I like mythology. I call myself Pagan because dancing under the moon is my kind of religion, and a purely rational approach to life is deadening.

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