Humanistic Paganism

Monthly Archives: November 2014


“Four Devotional Practices for Naturalistic Pagans” by Anna Walther

In my place-based, Naturalistic Paganism, I relate most often to nature powers. Humans around the world share the old, great powers: the abundance of the Earth, the strength and direction of the Wind, the Sun’s relentless fire. Other powers are younger and local: the bluebonnets that push up through the soil each spring, Central Texas’s many limestone creeks and springs, and even the water that flows through the tap of my own kitchen sink. I am always in relationship with these powers, whether I will it or not. My goal as a Pagan is to cultivate mindful relationships with these nature powers. I do not believe that the springs in any sense needed or wanted my offering, but I was different for having made it.

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“Interconnectedness vs. Insularity: Making A Case for Pagan Proselytzing” by John Halstead

This is the third in a 3-part series, looking critically at contemporary Neo-Paganism from an earth-centered perspective. Note: The views expressed in this essay are the author’s and are not necessarily representative of HumanisticPaganism.com or any of its other contributors. Experiencing Interconnectedness…

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“‘Goats’ Heads or Gaia?’: Instrumental Magic and Pagan Values” by John Halstead

Our late autumn theme here at HP is “Responsibility“.  This is the second in a 3-part series, looking critically at contemporary Neo-Paganism from an earth-centered perspective. Note: The views expressed in this essay are the author’s and are not necessarily representative…

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The Dilemma of Thanksgiving Grace for Religious Naturalists

Ah, those warm, comforting memories of Thanksgivings spent with family. … Or, are they sometimes not so blissful? Like when the family meal starts with a request that we all pray about Jesus’ blood?  If that sounds familiar, you may…

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“How Earth-Centered is Neo-Paganism Really?” by John Halstead

Does nature merely serve as a backdrop to our rituals which are inwardly focused? Are we, in the words of Posch, “standing with our backs to the world” — both literally and figuratively? Do we worship gods of nature or the God(dess) that is nature? Is our “magic” an expression of wonder, or just another attempt to achieve mastery over the natural world? Is our religion eco-centered or ego-centered? To what extent do our religious values translate into ecologically responsible practices, individually and collectively?

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