Day of Solidarity for Black Non-believers

Day of SolidarityThe Day of Solidarity was organized by Donald Wright for the first time in 2012 for the small but increasing percentage of Black non-believers in the U.S.  People of all colors are welcome at events across the country.

From African Americans for Humanism:

The percentage of black non-believers in the U.S. is small but increasing. Most have difficulty meeting other black non-believers or finding many who are involved in secular organizations. The internet has made many connections possible; however, the common feelings expressed by black non-believers are those of isolation, loneliness, and alienation. Often the remedy for these feelings is activism. This activism includes diligently searching for and befriending other non-believers, working with as many other non-believers as possible to address social ills, continuing to be educated about the factual world, providing positive expressions for secular ideas through writing and public speaking, and strengthening the secular community by supporting existing organizations as well as creating dynamic new ones. Unfettered activism is captured in the purpose of the Day of Solidarity for Black Non-Believers.

The Day of Solidarity for Black Non-Believers (DoS), held annually on the fourth Sunday in February, must be embraced beyond the events that take place in cities across the nation on that day. It must be used to build genuine communal relationships. It must be used to launch a wave of activism among blacks in America and other people of color as we strive to openly embrace our non-theist status in an ethical and dignified manner. Those that accept this call to activism must garner enough interest to create and support opportunities that will motivate those who have so far remained dormant except for an occasional message via email, Twitter, blogging, or postings on Facebook. This Day of Solidarity event is an effort to bring them out from behind those high tech media devices and other locations that keep them inconspicuous.

Anyone who supports this initiative can contact other non-theist individuals, groups, and organizations to plan a gathering, such as brunch, lunch, book or film discussion, museum trip, speaker presentation, etc. Decide on a time and place. Publicize the event as widely as possible. Use Facebook, Twitter, MeetUp.com, and other websites. Also consider newspaper and web-based community calendars, issuing local press releases, radio station announcements, and making personal invitations. When your planning is complete, post the details of your event on the DoS Facebook page for the benefit of others that may be looking for an event in your area.

See also Why the National Day of Solidarity for Black Nonbelievers is not just for Blacks only.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: