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Neural love story, by Trent Fowler

July 15, 2012
Corey Seehus, Brain Cells Inc, USA "This image represents human neural stem cells from fetal cortex"

“Contemplating how matter becomes mind leaves me with a sense of intellectual vertigo which has to be experienced to be appreciated, and reminds me that reality isn’t just stranger than I imagine, it’s stranger than I can imagine.”

This encounter began as
he lay tracing invisible shapes on her skin.
Triangles in the palm of her hand,
circles from her clavicle to her belly button.
She accepted the attention of his wandering hands and eyes
rather passively at first,
breath deep and slow,
her brain absorbed in making movies out of words on a page.

Eventually a spark from his fingertips landed amidst the dendrites,
and a wildfire began to smolder softly in the forests that were her nervous system.
Book now laid aside and forgotten,
the smoke and the fire crept along her spine as his lips found their way
to the small of her back and the nape of her neck.
Amidst the sheets of myelin the homunculus stirred from its slumber,
and watched as flames in the periphery gained strength.

Breath,
rapid and shallow now,
betrayed tectonic shifts
in her temporal lobe that gave
rise
to boiling clouds of ecstasy,
rising
like plumes of smoke from volcanoes piercing ocean floors,
rising
like the seismic rumbling growing deep inside of her.

He burned in the darkness, too,
thinking with his body out of necessity.
Any rational, discursive chatter
from his prefrontal cortex was drowned out
by the bright beacon of need shining
from deep in his limbic system.
Molten rivers of endorphines
cast his mental landscape in the bright red
of a fire still hot at midnight.

This beacon was a timeless engine driving
tiny changes that crept through the
mind and matter which made an animal.
He shared it with the other citizens in
the Kingdom of Life,
it was a language they all knew.

As masters of the human dialect,
they wrote wordless poems with their heartbeats.

As sums of this ancient process,
they sought its rhythms eagerly.

As beings lost in each other,
they moved like mountains consumed by fire.

The author

Trent Fowler

Trent Fowler is an English teacher in South Korea.  He graduated with a degree in Psychology from Hendrix college, where he also studied philosophy and neuroscience, among other things.  Though he considers himself a staunch atheist, he is still very much interested in ritual, meditation, and various religious practices which can serve as a means for exploring and changing consciousness.  As a writer, he has worked for numerous websites, blogs, and small businesses.  He also enjoys hiking, playing guitar, dabbling in electronics with mixed results, and learning everything he can about anything he can.

Check out Trent’s other posts:

6 Comments
  1. Rua Lupa permalink
    July 30, 2012 8:29 pm

    I’m not surprised to see no comments here. How can anybody comment without first thinking, “I’ll be in my bunk.” (Firefly TV series reference) and quickly following through! lol

    I particularly loved the lacing in the eons of this natural act that is every bit a part of all life, even if they don’t “move like mountains consumed by fire”

    Again, A lovely piece Trent :D

  2. July 31, 2012 3:40 am

    Alas, summer time is never overflowing with blog comments. :-(

    • Rua Lupa permalink
      July 31, 2012 10:27 pm

      At least its a sign that folks are out and about. I’m only playing catch up for one week before going on my annual trip. Hope the summer is treating you well.

      • August 1, 2012 1:39 am

        You as well, Rua. I’m on a short vacation to Hokkaido with my wife, visiting the little town where I spent five years. What incredible memories are flooding back. Today I spent hours walking around, staring out at the endless sea, and walking along the river. Have fun on your trip. :-)

        • Rua Lupa permalink
          August 1, 2012 9:04 am

          Will do. :D Sounds like your trip might merit a post of its own. If so, I look forward to it. :)

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