Skip to content

Of consequence and wonder: Exploring the “why’s” of Humanistic Paganism, by C Luke Mula

October 16, 2011
Pine cone on Loring Park lakeshore

Exploratory practices focus on the moment, discovering wonder in the fact of being.

photo by B. T. Newberg

This week, C Luke Mula challenges us to take a deeper look at the fundamentals.  Why are we doing this?  What do we hope to get out of it?  Through a careful critique of the Fourfold Path, Luke advances our model of Humanistic Paganism.

A good deal of discussion goes on here about what Humanistic Paganism is exactly, and how we put it into practice in our lives. These are good and necessary things to talk about, but what I don’t see much talk of is why we identify with or adhere to Humanistic Paganism. In other words, what could possibly be rewarding about the types of practices that Humanistic Paganism prescribes? What is the practitioner getting out of it?

I want to look into this question today and discuss some of the implications of the answer. Before we do, though, let’s recap the Fourfold Path real quick.

First, there’s Exploration of the Five +1. This principle is about exploring the world around us with our five senses and the world within us through introspection. Through these we can construct both an empirically-testable understanding of the external world and a semi-empirical, semi-testable understanding of the internal world.

Next, there’s Relationship with Mythology. This is about identifying with the mythological, becoming intimately familiar with it, and incorporating it into our life development.

Third, there’s Responsible Action. This is about seeing what problems we as humans have caused in the world and taking the responsibility to fix those problems, while at the same time being conscious enough to prevent further problems.

Finally, there’s A Sense of Wonder. This is about never letting the majesty of nature cease to fascinate and inspire us.

Okay, that’s simple enough, but do these tell us why we’re dedicating ourselves to these principles?

I think that before we look at what we’re getting out of HP, we need to look at what we’re putting into it. That means understanding what types of actions we are taking when we put HP into practice in our lives.

Being and doing

Looking back to the Fourfold Path, we can see that there are two basic types of practices in Humanistic Paganism.

The first is simply exploring. Exploratory practices take an absolute focus on the moment, a forgetting of goals and drives, a simple act of being. These types of practices are about engaging the senses and exploring them to the fullest. They are about experiencing for the sake of the experience, for reveling in the substance of it, and for celebrating the fact that something simply is. For an excellent example of this type of practice, check out Thomas Schenk’s article on bicycle meditation.

The second type of practice is making a difference. This is the practice described by Responsible Action, and it is primarily about making consequential decisions. To fully take part in this element of the Fourfold Path, it isn’t enough to see an issue and do something insignificant about it; instead, we are called to truly make a difference in the world with our actions, to leave this earth and our fellow human beings significantly better than we found them. Here we are presented with the premise of “humans cause most of their own problems,” and we are required to respond to that premise with our very lives, an aspect of Humanistic Paganism I’d like to see talked about more often.

Of consequence and wonder

Now, with those two types of practices in our grasp, can we finally answer the question, “Why Humanistic Paganism?” I believe we can, and I believe that the answer lies in the two different senses of meaning you get from the practices of HP.

The first type of meaningful experience you can get out of Humanistic Paganism is the real sense of consequence from making a difference in the world. Seeing tangible consequences manifest as a result of our own personal decisions is an extremely fulfilling and meaningful experience, and it is why humanism in general has been able to become such a widespread movement. Even more, by taking responsible action, we create a story with our lives and forge new mythology with our very existence.

The second type of meaning we can get out of Humanistic Paganism is what is described in the final element of the Fourfold Path: a sense of wonder. This sense of wonder is a direct result of exploratory practices, and it only comes about by focusing solely on an experience for the sake of the experience. Through exploration, we can truly feel the wonder of the world; in it, instead of just thinking, we know the universe to be wonderful. The mystery of living consumes our senses, and our life is filled to the brim with meaning, even if but for a moment.

Putting it into practice

The thing about these two types of action and meaning is that they are mutually exclusive: you cannot fully commit to exploration and in the same instance fully commit to making consequential decisions.(1) Because of this, you have three options in putting Humanistic Paganism into practice.

First, you may want to emphasize the consequential aspects of it, and focus on taking responsible action in the world, with exploration playing a supporting role. Through this, you still have more of a sense of wonder than through adhering only to consequential practices, and you can understand your life story in a more poetic form than the consequential by itself would normally allow.

On the other hand, you may want to emphasize the exploratory aspects of Humanistic Paganism. In this approach, making consequential decisions takes a backseat to simply experiencing life. If a problem comes up that needs addressing, you’ll address it, but here you don’t go out of your way to take responsible action. The sense of wonder is placed first and foremost.

Finally, you may want to fully balance exploration with making a difference. And this is the tricky one. Because exploring and making a difference are fundamentally different types of actions, it is extremely easy to get lost in one and forget about the other. That means that if you really want to balance the two types of actions, you need to develop some practices in order to do so.

And that’s what I want to discuss here. So let’s jump into it.

First how are you practicing HP? Are you emphasizing one type of practice over the other, or are you balancing them?

And second, if you are balancing the two, what are some concrete examples of how you’re doing that?

—————-

(1) For an introduction into why I make this claim, check out Daniel Kahneman’s TED talk on the riddle of memory vs. experience, or look into Ian McGilchrist’s book The Master and His Emissary.

The author

C Luke Mula

C Luke Mula is the voice of one crying out in the wilderness. Endlessly fascinated by meaningful experiences of all stripes, he is constantly experimenting with ways to make life more meaningful, a process he calls “faith design.” He co-directs The Way to Actuality, a website founded to foster the discussion and discovery of Purpose wherever it can be found, regardless of religious or secular context.

About these ads
38 Comments
  1. October 17, 2011 10:25 am

    Dear C Luke:

    I would like to hear more about your step two. I have explored mythology of all stripes for a long time. I find it fascinating; a wonderful object of contemplation. But I am still of two minds as to whether at this point in time it is more an obstacle or an aid to spiritual development.

    Also, I certainly agree with your step four, “a sense of wonder,” but I hope that when you talk about the majesty of nature, you are using nature in the all inclusive sense that includes all human activity (what I term Nature).

    • October 17, 2011 12:57 pm

      Thanks for the response, Thomas!

      First off, I want to clarify that the four principles aren’t my principles. They’re the principles Brandon originally laid out in order to identify yourself as a Humanistic Pagan. So I can’t take credit for them.

      As for your worries about how I’m using “nature,” rest assured that my use would definitely include all human activity. Really all I meant by it was “everything actual and everything possible,” or, more simply, “everything.”

      As for the “relationship with mythology,” I don’t think this principle is about actually exploring mythology. Instead, it seems more about just letting the mythological inspire and color everything about this path.

      But I do understand your concern. Before I respond to it, would you mind explaining what you mean by “spiritual development” here? (maybe with an example)

      • October 17, 2011 1:35 pm

        Sorry, didn’t read your post carefully enough. Hopefully Brandon will dedicate one of the Thursdays to further exploration of the “relationship with mythology,” idea.

        The idea you put forth of “letting the mythological inspire and color everything…” is quite interesting. I think the way you use “mythological” here is fairly similar to the way I use the word “spiritual.”

        Thomas

        • October 17, 2011 6:42 pm

          I actually don’t think I’m using “mythological” at all the way you’re using “spiritual.” I mean it in terms of literal myth; that all Humanistic Paganism practices are inspired and colored by the stories, symbols, artwork, music, etc. of paganism, whatever that entails.

          • October 18, 2011 10:32 am

            C Luke you write: “all Humanistic Paganism practices are inspired and colored by the stories, symbols, artwork, music, etc. of paganism, whatever that entails.”

            Can you provide some examples?

            • October 18, 2011 6:53 pm

              The best examples on this site would be almost all of Brandon’s writings (especially his retreat). Or you can check out John Halstead’s site (http://allergicpagan.wordpress.com) for more great examples.

              Let me be clear that I’m not saying that anyone who identifies with HP has to relate to mythology all the time in everything they do. It’s just that when you do rituals or anything else that is inspired by mythology, you can consider it a practice that would fall within Humanistic Paganism.

        • October 18, 2011 12:54 am

          And let me clarify further:

          “Exploring with the Five 1″ to me includes exploring mythologies and mythological art. So this is a direction in which you can explore, to be sure.

          All I’m saying here is that “Relationship with mythology” seems to simply mean that, in Humanistic Paganism, every practice is mythological, whether it’s taking responsible action or exploring with the senses.

  2. October 17, 2011 6:10 pm

    I truthfully don’t consider myself a Humanistic Pagan. I am only here because the topics that come up here are of interest to me. I consider myself a Saegoah (Seeker of Ehoah), and in extension more generally a Naturalist. This is where I take my cues and direct myself.

    I enjoy mythology which are, to me, just well loved stories that have survived for some time. And in so doing, carry some value and likely insights as well, but not necessarily. As fun as they are, I don’t see how mythology is needed for well-being (which is what we mean when we say spirituality right? If not, then what does the word spirituality mean to you?). I also fail to see how you need to relate to humanism or paganism to be responsible, explore with your senses + introspection for self betterment and/or discovery, or be in sense of awe. These can just as easily be done without Humanism or Paganism in my view.

    • October 17, 2011 6:50 pm

      As fun as they are, I don’t see how mythology is needed for well-being . . . I also fail to see how you need to relate to humanism or paganism to be responsible, explore with your senses introspection for self betterment and/or discovery, or be in sense of awe. These can just as easily be done without Humanism or Paganism in my view.

      I’m confused. Where did anyone claim that you have to be a humanist or a pagan or deal at all with mythology for any of these things? As far as I can tell, HP is just saying, “Hey, you want a sense of consequence and wonder? Here’s one way to get that.” It’s just one option of many, and that’s all we’re claiming or discussing.

      But I might have missed something, so feel free to correct me if I’m wrong on this.

      • October 18, 2011 8:16 am

        You are not wrong, and are right to point out that this is something that is one option among many.

        Let my clarify my thoughts a bit further to explain what I am trying to say.

        If you were to remove the Humanistic Paganism label, and just watched how people who associated themselves with Humanistic Paganism behave. You might get a whole different picture where outsiders may never consider you being affiliated with humanism or paganism. If mythology plays such a big role in this, then why not have that as part of the title instead?

        What I’ve been seeing, and whats attracted me is not the humanism or paganism. Its the pursuit of knowledge and understanding, the analyzing and questioning, the pushing of the envelope about what is expected of us and what we should be doing as citizens of the greater world, and what we should be doing to better ourselves and find fulfillment.

        This approach and behaviour is more akin to a guild of philosophers than anything else in my mind. Or perhaps something else entirely.

        • October 18, 2011 6:47 pm

          Right, but the pushing of boundaries and questioning and analyzing is almost always within the context of the mythological. Just a quick perusal of the writings and interviews on this site shows that about half of the works deal specifically with mythology and mythological practices, and the percentage is much higher if you include “relating with the universe” or “communing with nature” (which doesn’t seem like a big stretch at all to me). So it does seem that the community of people who associate with HP are taking part in a certain type of practice, practice which might readily be called “pagan” and which certainly is mythological in nature.

          Now, I don’t have a history of association with any kind of paganism outside of this site, so what seems to be your aversion to the use of “paganism” as a title is sort of curious to me. It’s pretty clear when I hear that term (and I might be a minority) that it automatically presumes the mythological, even if that is “nature mythology” instead of polytheistic mythology.

          And again, I apologize if I’m misreading anything you’re saying or misrepresenting you in the slightest. Please correct me if I am.

          • October 18, 2011 7:54 pm

            “…but the pushing of boundaries and questioning and analyzing is almost always within the context of the mythological.”

            I’ll use a bit of phrase that Jane Goodall had used, “Its a very wazzy line” between mythology and any other story we share. And virtually every story has something to say about ourselves. So I personally don’t see mythology as something that completely stands on its own. It meshes and blends easily into tales of modern telling. Thus removing anything that makes it exclusive source for any form of analyzing and questioning, many modern tellings have just as much to share.

            “Just a quick perusal of the writings and interviews on this site shows that about half of the works deal specifically with mythology and mythological practices”

            I often wonder if this is only due to there being an expectation of worth rather than something quantifiable. Not that I am saying there is nothing of value, there is, just it appears to be a bit blown out of proportion. Much of what is said can be said in a similar fashion with modern fiction too, yet we seem to be mostly ignoring them and push them aside. Much how like Shakespeare is highly valued, yet there are as good as playwrights today i.e. Sarah Ruhl. But we don’t hear peep about her writings or others of similar caliber.

            “So it does seem that the community of people who associate with HP are taking part in a certain type of practice, practice which might readily be called “pagan” and which certainly is mythological in nature…..so what seems to be your aversion to the use of “paganism” as a title is sort of curious to me.”

            Yes, it does seem to be the case that most people associated with paganism here at HP. Although I would like to see those numbers counted to verify such a statement. I personally just don’t like ‘pagan’ because it functions as a catchall term and therefore, not very useful. But that is just me. I’ve no beef with Pagans themselves, just the vagueness of the title. I thus have difficulty understanding the reasoning behind the strong attachments to this word.

            I admit that I do like to push difficult topics like this (I am almost a junkie in that regard) and I want to make sure that it is understood that it isn’t a personal matter, and is purely intellectual. That said, I may have been a bit too pushy on this topic and others. This comes out of my enthusiasm of seeing others willing to analyze and discuss such topics, as most places I’ve come across are not willing to step back and try to take on different perspectives. That is what I really like about this blog. So forgive me if I have let this enthusiasm get ahead of me again (it wouldn’t be the first time) I’m slowly becoming more conscious of this and am trying to reign it in a bit. Friendly prods are welcome in that regard. :D

            • October 18, 2011 10:18 pm

              Regarding your first point about mythology being just like any other story, I’m going to have to point out that every concept imaginable disappears into closely related concepts when you look at it too closely, mythology included. I mean, just look at “life.” Even biology, which claims to be the study of life, has no set definition of it, and it seems to just disappear when you get down to the chemical level. This doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t study life, though. It just means we get a pretty good idea of what we’re talking about, and we don’t zoom in too closely on it. The same goes for mythology.

              Now to be clear about your second point: no one is claiming that other types of stories have no value. All we’re saying is that we’re focusing on particular types of stories and symbols: those of pagan mythology. Why? Because they’re inspiring. It’s really that simple. So if anyone would like to talk objectively about other types of literature or art, that’s fine. No one has a problem with that. This just probably isn’t the best place for it, because Humanistic Paganism has chosen to focus on this specific source of inspiration.

              Just so you know, I’m not resisting because I see this as a difficult topic; I’m resisting because I truthfully don’t see it as an issue at all. There are a set of principles which from the beginning were laid out for anyone who’d like to associate with Humanistic Paganism, and this is one of them. It’s not required that you align yourself or your life with HP’s principles, but they serve as a common focus for all who are interested, and I just don’t know that turning this aspect of it into an issue is worth the time or effort.

              (And don’t worry, Rua, I’m not taking any of this personally. You’re getting purely intellectual discussion from me as well.)

              (And by the way, Brandon, please shoot me down if I’m stepping out of line any of these times that I talk about Humanistic Paganism, its principles, its goals, etc. The last thing I want to do is circulate ideas about HP that aren’t accurate.)

            • October 18, 2011 10:38 pm

              Well, I am really getting a lot out of this convo, and I hope you are too Luke.

              I like your point on looking at things too closely. Yet I can’t help but feel that is exactly what inspires me, especially when it comes to life. The closer you look, the more you see the lines vanish and the bigger picture becomes more clear. I say, “bring it on” to looking closer and seeing the connections.

              On your second point – point taken. And I truthfully don’t disagree with any of the approaches to mythology I’ve seen to date (or at least that I can remember). Heck, to be honest, I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for BT’s invite, and I’m glad he did. It puts a few new ways of looking at things on my path.

              All this really stemmed from the question, “First how are you practicing HP? Are you emphasizing one type of practice over the other, or are you balancing them?”

              So I don’t know if turning these aspects into an issue is worth the time or effort either.

              I appreciate your input Luke, and thanks for your time – I’m off to bed now so Good Night!

            • October 18, 2011 11:49 pm

              Yes, definitely an interesting conversation, and I think I speak for everyone here when I say that we’re glad Brandon invited you here. You’ve definitely got a lot to offer the HP community, even if you don’t personally, completely identify with it.

            • October 19, 2011 9:24 am

              Wow, Thanks! *trying not to blush here…wait…too late* :D

              I certainly hope that I am contributing in a positive way as I definitely don’t want to be a bother. And you summed up my relationship with HP quite well. Its not a Love-Hate relationship, but more Intrigued-Questioning if that makes any sense :)

              Glad to see you at the Silva Colloquium, hopefully we get more of this sort of thing there too!

            • October 20, 2011 10:55 pm

              Wow, I’m just getting to read these comments now, as I’m getting over a five-day cold that knocked me out, plus an intense interview for possibly teaching in Korea (I think it went well), so HP couldn’t hit the priority list for a while. But now I’m reading this excellent conversation, and totally digging it.

              First off: what synchronicity that without seeing this in-depth discussion of mythology, the topic I chose for Thing on Thursday was precisely that!

              Second, to allay any remaining fears: Rua, everything I’ve read so far has been constructive, welcome, and necessary commentary; and Luke, everything I’ve read from you has accurately described HP principles.

              Third, I’ll underscore that a multiplicity of viewpoints are always welcome here, and no one needs to feel like they identify with HP to participate. Everything offered in the spirit of constructive dialogue is cherished.

              Finally, I just wanna add one little brush stroke to the picture painted here. Mythology is certainly not necessary for everyone to lead a fulfilling life but for some it is vital, just as painting is not necessary for most but for painters it is life or death. Nor is “Paganism” in any way necessary to get the spiritual inspiration a person needs. But both offer particularly intriguing starting points. The value of a core image or idea is its power to set you afire with imagination or contemplation. That contemplation may lead you away from the original image, but it’s what got you moving in the first place. That’s why I’ve said before that words like “Druid” or “Witch” are particularly moving labels for spiritual movements. Now, whether “Humanistic Paganism” has potential as such a core idea is very much open to debate. But in a nutshell, that’s why I would choose a label like “paganism” as a starting point over something like “fiction” or “naturalism.” To me at least, it has more of a sense of mystery, history, culture, sacredness, and the numinous. Others may find it less so in paganism and more so in other core ideas.

            • ryanspellman permalink
              October 21, 2011 4:45 pm

              I’ll second that! This was a good discussion.

          • October 19, 2011 9:24 am

            I think I understand what you mean when you say that paganism presumes the mythological. Our understanding of “paganism,” whatever that word means, comes from mythology. The question becomes, then, which aspects of pagan mythology do we find particularly meaningful?

            • October 19, 2011 9:59 am

              *shrugs* I like em all and find any good story to be valuable, but when it comes to being particularly meaningful? I don’t know, in what way do you mean? Like Padora’s Box or Pseudologoi as teachings or as ways to make us think?

            • October 19, 2011 10:03 am

              I know the Sami people’s social structure with their children revolves more around story telling to teach lessons and make their kids ponder how they should really behave. They may have a good few relevant tales toward what could be considered meaningful.

    • October 18, 2011 10:41 am

      Rua, you write: …well-being (which is what we mean when we say spirituality right? If not, then what does the word spirituality mean to you?).

      Spirituality certainly means a lot more to me than “well-being.” My experience of spirituality has been as a fundamental transformation in how I experience the world. There is an article on my blog titled “What is Spirituality Without the Supernatural” that goes a little further into what I mean by spirituality, see: http://hiveoftheinvisible.blogspot.com/2011/10/what-is-spirituality-without.html

      • October 18, 2011 10:55 am

        I had to come to terms of what the root word meant – spirit and therefore supernatural. I only recently realized I meant something different when I used the word and am now attempting to say what I really mean, and I was wondering if others felt the same way.

        I am truthfully glad you use the word with its intending meaning, as to not be misleading, which is what I am trying to avoid.

      • October 18, 2011 11:01 am

        I just read your blog and wonder if I initially misinterpreted what you meant. Are you saying there is no supernatural or is your definition of supernatural different?

        • October 19, 2011 9:14 am

          By supernatural I would mean something that required a completely non-physical cause, and I don’t believe such a thing exists. Spirituality deals with “psychological” growth and transformation (though by the word psychological I am not referring to the “science” of psychology, just mental phenomenon).

          Some people think that because the world is not supernatural, it is completely open to rational thought. This I don’t believe. My spirituality is largely shaped by Eastern views, and the highest state in these (Samadhi, Satori, Nirvana) requires precisely a transcendence of rational thought. Rational thought always requires an abstracting that is slightly separated from the “concrete” world. To get beyond that “slightly separated” state, requires a going beyond rationality. This has nothing to do with the condition of the physical world, but has everything to do with the conditioning of the mental world.

          Reason is the great tool for knowing and acting in the physical world, but if one’s goal is the fullness of being, then one needs to know how to tuck that tool away for a while.

          • October 19, 2011 9:33 am

            Very well said, and I have to agree with your description of Spirituality being in the realm of the Mind being Thought. To the point that I wonder if ‘spirituality’ is the right word. I myself have replaced it with psychology, yet I am uncertain if that is the best choice of word.

            Would you be interested in continuing this topic on the Ehoah Forum – Silva Colloquium? I’d love to hear more of your thoughts on this. http://silvacollo.hoop.la/forums

      • October 18, 2011 2:44 pm

        Would ‘Fulfillment’ be more accurate?

  3. October 18, 2011 8:32 am

    Here is one question, “What attracts you to this blog?”

  4. October 21, 2011 5:02 pm

    “That’s why I’ve said before that words like “Druid” or “Witch” are particularly moving labels for spiritual movements.” – B.T.

    That’s why Saegoah (Seeker of Ehoah, seag- is the root word for seek) is used in relation to Ehoah. Two big words that are -isms are not so conducive to common use. I hope that you find what fits right for this and I look forward to seeing it, and I also strongly believe that myths, or stories in general, play a bit part in it from what I am hearing.

    • October 22, 2011 10:20 am

      I meant to Say BIG PART!!! Sorry major Typo!! I only realized that after my response to your response!!

      • ryanspellman permalink
        October 22, 2011 10:23 am

        I kind of wondered if that was what you meant. Funny how typos can completely change the intended message!

        • October 22, 2011 10:25 am

          LOL, yeah, although it might bring about some new things that we might have missed out on otherwise. Even though I doubt that was the case this time. :D

      • October 22, 2011 8:40 pm

        >I meant to Say BIG PART!!! Sorry major Typo!!

        Oh! Not “bit part” but “big part.” That makes much more sense now!

  5. October 22, 2011 6:08 am

    I must say I’m fairly nonplussed by the suggestion that mythology plays a “bit part” in HP. As Luke pointed out, roughly half of the pieces here feature mythology in one way or another. It was one of the four key elements from the start, and currently it ties for the rank of number one most-chosen element from our values poll on October 6th.

    But more than just the idea or expectation that it is important, mythology has revealed its importance in moving ways. Thomas shared his dreams of a women which he identifies with the Goddess. Ryan shared how the gods and goddesses function in his appreciation for the universe. John Halstead made a case for the re-enchantment or “re-godding” of the world. And I’ve shared the powerful roles Isis and Persephone have played in my life. I can’t see how these examples support the idea that mythology plays a “bit part.”

    Perhaps mythology might appear like a curious side interest, not really essential, if one is only reading, enjoying, and reflecting on the myths. But as Karen Armstrong and others have noted, living myths are usually inseparable from ritual. Those who live their myths in their rituals, meditations, festivals, and daily lives, come to know them on a whole other level. They start to reverberate in a way that is more experiential than rational. They become part of one’s identity, one’s sense of being-in-the-world. They become genuinely essential.

    After discovering this kind of relationship with mythology through Paganism, I tried leaving it behind. In search of a more blatantly naturalistic path, I became a Humanist, i.e. a Secular Humanist, in hopes that it would be as fulfilling. But it wasn’t. I found myself returning to ritual, meditation, and prayer. And it wasn’t a return like how an addict goes back to his habit, but how a traveler returns to a cherished city, perhaps even to his home.

    • October 22, 2011 9:34 am

      “Thomas shared his dreams of a women which he identifies with the Goddess. Ryan shared how the gods and goddesses function in his appreciation for the universe. John Halstead made a case for the re-enchantment or “re-godding” of the world. And I’ve shared the powerful roles Isis and Persephone have played in my life. I can’t see how these examples support the idea that mythology plays a “bit part.””

      What are Gods, Goddesses, spirits, divine entities etc.? They are all Myths of one form or another. Of which you are only conscious of their form because of exposure to various forms of story telling. In many native myths there are beings that you and I would most likely not relate to and would not visualize in any way in our lives. But to those who have heard the stories are more than likely picture them playing a role in some form or other in their lives. Whether in ritual, meditation, ceremony, superstition, for the pleasure of hearing or telling it, or just a backdrop to their culture. It is in now in the subconscious and can be related to.

      That is my understanding of it.

Trackbacks

  1. Upcoming work « Humanistic Paganism
  2. Upcoming work « Humanistic Paganism
  3. Upcoming work « Humanistic Paganism

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 636 other followers

%d bloggers like this: